EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the first of two installments of personal information and photos of candidates for the title of 2019 Cavalcade Queen. Look for the July 17 edition of the Pawhuska Journal-Capital for the rest of the candidate information.


Heather Ross


Heather Ross proudly rides for the Buckaroo Crew on the club’s very first trip to Cavalcade. Heather is the 21-year-old daughter of Stacey Ross and the late Christopher Ross. She hangs her hat in Glencoe.


The Buckaroo Crew organized this year because they all love Cavalcade. They have a membership of 80 cowboys and cowgirls. The club officers include — President, Odie Muns, Vice President, Tyler Ornder, Secretary, Resa Hinkle-Muns.


Sponsors of Ross are — Rocking R Ranch Performance Horses, T3 Barrel Horses, Lucky 13 Racing, MV Quarter Horse, Gold Dust Photography, Red Fork Ranch Feeds, Randa Novotny & Family, The Table Cafe, Glencoe, Formal Fantasy, Stillwater.


Q&A:


Question: There are many great things to love about rodeo — the tradition, the history, the excitement, the competition. What is it you love most about America’s number one sport?


Answer: Well, I am a huge horse enthusiast, and I love watching them perform — from the barrel horses getting to burn around a turn and the run hard home, the roping horses itching to launch out of the box and chase that steer, or the bronc horses who are turning, kicking and bucking, trying to get their rider off. What I really love though is watching the teamwork, whether it is a horse and rider or just a pair of team ropers or any of your other teams, like the rodeo workers. Everyone is working together to make this sport what is. The love and passion everyone has for it is what makes rodeo so amazing.


Q: Define the role of a rodeo queen and her impact on our rodeo.


A: In my opinion, the rodeo queen is the face of the rodeo. She is the one who inspires the little kids to work towards their dreams and achieve big goals. The queen also goes out to the public and informs them about upcoming events or just the rodeo itself. She is more than just a pretty face, as the girls that represent these rodeos are able to ride horses and work cattle with the best of them. As a rodeo queen, she has to be able to encourage everyone from the littlest of kids to the older generation that have been around rodeo for years.


Q: Please share your favorite memory about Cavalcade, or is it you first year, and what is the thing you’re most looking forward to?


A: I would have to say the year 2015. That was the year I had the great and wild idea that I would try rodeo queening for the first time. I also thought that competing in three other events while attempting to queen for the first time was an amazing idea. It was quite the week for me, and I learned so much from everyone. I made lifetime friendships and some amazing connections. And while those are some of my fondest memories of Cavalcade that year, I have to say that watching and being one of the many rodeo queens trying to do the most push-ups in a spontaneous competition to win some polo wraps was the funniest thing I have ever been around.


Oaklie Katera


Oaklie Katera is from Stillwater. This Payne County cowgirl is bringing her contagious smile to Cavalcade riding for the Drumright Roundup Club. She is the 20-year-old daughter of Shyla Chapman.


The Drumright Roundup Club was organized in 1962. This year, they come to Cavalcade 130 members strong. Drumright cowboys and cowgirls enjoy participating in parades, open rodeos, and most of competing at Cavalcade each year.


Club Officers include — President, Mary Kalka, Vice President, Luc Patterson, Secretary, Amanda Wetzel, Treasurer, Judy Toothman.


Sponsors of Oaklie Katera are — Randa Novotny & Family, Equine Valley Ranch, Formal Fantasy, Stillwater, Stillwater Equine, Stillwater and RanchFork Feeds.


Q&A:


Question: Please share your favorite memory about Cavalcade, or is it your first year, and what is the thing you are most looking forward to?


Answer: The entire week of Cavalcade in 2016 would be my favorite memory. That year, I took my three-year-old mare, and it was her first rodeo. She had not seen cattle yet. Taking her was special for me because she was the first horse I had done all the training on. Bringing Katie was my “lets see how well of a trainer I am” moment. She made me very proud, and a lot of people could not believe she was only three. This year, I’m excited to bring her back and make even more memories.


Q: Share your plan on getting the next generation of rodeo fans and competitors involved in the sport.


A: Rodeo is a sport dominated by men, but where the toughest cowgirls come to ride. Kids line the fences to watch the grand entry, and before anyone one else enters the arena, the queens of the rodeo ride in. I’ve experienced seeing little girls’ eyes shine brighter as they stare in awe, watching as rodeo queens pass by. They look up to their parents saying “I wanna be a Rodeo Queen.” This past year, I found myself in the position of getting to coach a few younger girls in [a] rodeo queen competition. Watching them grow and become more confident in themselves, as well as being confident in the saddle, is a very humbling experience to be a part of. This coaching experience has reminded me of where I started and where I am today. I believe that getting the next generation involved in rodeo is not the hard part, Rodeo has a reputation which does that all on its own. Making sure kids are given the right tools for our sport is key, and that’s where my niche comes in. It’s a great fit for me.


Q: If you were to describe Cavalcade to someone who has never been to a rodeo, whatwould you say, or if this is your first year, how has Cavalcade been described to you?


A: Oh, where to even begin — the lights, the crowd and the bands — Cavalcade is the largest amateur rodeo. The energy that fills that entire fairgrounds is beyond description. If you’ve never been to a rodeo, this one will blow your mind. In simple terms, there is more diversity in the events than at your normal rodeo. The Pony Express Race is an adrenaline rush just to watch. The Chuck Wagon Races will leave you laughing at how every race turns out because you never know who will win. If you want to hear great bands and watch a rodeo that tops all of them, then go to Cavalcade.


Shiloh Martin


Shiloh Martin is proudly riding in for the Big Bend Roundup Club at the 73rd Cavalcade Rodeo. Shiloh was raised in Burbank, where she still hangs her hat. She is the 18-year-old daughter of Jay and Stephanie Martin.


The Big Bend Roundup Club started in 2018, and currently has a membership of 15. All members share a love for team roping so they stay very active together. Big Bend RUC is ready for Cavalcade this year.


Club Officers include — President, Scott Gibson, Vice President, Misty Bledsoe, Secretary, Hailey Gibson.


Sponsors of Shiloh Martin are — A&M Horse Company, Stillwater, GB Quarter Horses, Fairfax, Bar Diamond Leather, Shidler, Rockin’ C Therapy, Cherokee, Four Ace Photo, Burbank, Golay Veterinarian Services, Shidler, Katrina and Terra Fenton, Pawnee.


Q&A:


Question: Share your plan on getting the next generation of rodeo fans and competitiors involved in our sport.


Answer: Our youth is not the contestants of tomorrow, they are the contestants of today. The biggest thing we can do to advocate for rodeo is invest in the next generation of contestants by encouraging them to ask questions and enter.


Q: There are many great things to love about rodeo — the tradition, the history, the excitement, the competition. What is it that you love most about America’s number one sport?


A: I was raised by at least fifteen different people, who didn’t share my last name, because I was raised hauling to rodeos. Family is at the very center of what rodeo stands for, making it my favorite sport.


Q: Define the role of a rodeo queen and her impact on our rodeo.


A: The role of a rodeo queen is to be the liaison between the tough rodeo contestants and the excited fans of the sport. A rodeo queen takes the time to educate fans while other cowgirls and cowboys put on the show.


Nell Kreder


Nell Kreder is riding into Cavalcade73 wearing the banner of the Skiatook Roundup Club. She is the 20-year-old daughter of Shann Kreder. She makes her home in Ramona.


The Skiatook Roundup Club was organized in 1946, and boasts a membership of 450 cowboys and cowgirls. Club activities include hosting open rodeos, barrel races, bull ridings, and their playdays are legendary. Thanks to the many great families who come together to keep rodeo growing in Skiatook.


Club Officers include — President, Johnna Huddleston, Vice President, Katrina Huddleston, Secretary, Candace Polson.


Skiatook RUC won the Cavalcade race for top honors in the year 1950 and took home the prestigious All-Around Club award at the 4th annual Cavalcade.


Q&A:


Question: Share your plan on getting the next generation of rodeo fans and competitiors involved in our sport.


Answer: My plan would be to get more youth involved by having more youth events and rodeos.


Q: Define the role of a rodeo queen and her impact on our rodeo.


A: She is the face of the sport of rodeo. She gives a strong education and knowledgable account of what goes on behind the scenes of a successful rodeo.


Q: Please share your favorite memory about Cavalcade, or is it your first year, what is the thing you are most looking forward to?


A: My favorite memory from Cavalcade is meeting all the new people, and I look forward to making all the fun new memories.


Aiyana Jackson


Aiyana Jackson is representing the Talala Rebels Roundup Club with pride at our 73rd Cavalcade Rodeo. This cowgirl hails from Barnsdall, and she is the 18-year-old niece of Ernie and Kathleen Jackson.


The Talala Rebels Roundup Club was organized in 2016, and their roster currently has 30 members who enjoy riding in parades and rodeos, volunteering at fundraisers and benefits, and participating at Cavalcade.


Club Officers include — President, Autumne Collins, Vice President, Laura Lank, Secretary, Ruby Dust.


The sponsors of Aiyana Jackson are — J-C & Sons Waste Management, J & N Tires and More, Marvin Cutting Horses and Tinker’s Glass House Bar & Grill.


Q&A:


Question: Please share your favorite memory about Cavalcade, or is it your first year, what is the thing you are most looking forward to?


Answer: My favorite memory or memories of Cavalcade all come from riding my horse around after the rodeo. I love that I can hear the band playing, and people having a good time, and enjoy watching some of my queen friends working their horses. I also love the many times I’ve ran across little ones racing on the track.


Q: If you were to desribe Cavalcade to someone who has never been to a rodeo, wht would you say, or if this is your first year, how has Cavalcade been described to you?


A: I would share Cavalcade by telling someone that it is definitely an experience that a person will never forget. There are so many great people to meet at Cavalcade and spend time around. I would also remember to mention all the amazing events and vendors that make our event so unique.


Q: There are many great things to love about rodeo — the tradition, the history, the excitement, the competition. What is it that you love most about America’s number one sport?


A: What I love most about rodeo is the excitement and competition. I love hearing the crowd cheering while there’s a time on the clock to beat. To me, it is an amazing feeling and a rush all at the same time.


Rachel Harrold


Miss Rachel Harrold, an Okmulgee County girl, saddles up for Dentonville Rough Riders at the 73rd Cavalcade Rodeo. She makes her home in Beggs, and she is the 22-year-old daughter of Paula and Chuck Harrold.


Dentonville Rough Riders organized in 1992, and currently enjoys 24 members, who love riding in parades and rodeos. The Rough Riders especially love competing at Cavalcade.


Club Officers include — President, Chuck Harrold, Vice President, Ally Majors, Secretary, Paula Harrold.


Sponsors of Rachel Harrold are — Pampered Chef, Paula Harrold, Consultant, Beggs, Do-Si-Do Crafts and Boutique, Beggs, and Henson’s Feed & Fertilizer, Beggs.


Q&A:


Question: There are many great things to love about rodeo — the tradition, the history, the excitement, the competition. What is it that you love most about America’s number one sport?


Answer: I love the thrill of being on the back of my horse, and running as fast as he can go. I love having confidence that no matter how my run went, that with every stride is a new lesson or blessing.


Q: Share your plan on getting the next generation of rodeo fans and competitiors involved in our sport.


A: I would continue to promote roundup club events, parades, and Cavalcade on all social media, and also invite friends/family and others to watch or participate.


Q: If you were to describe Cavalcade to someone who has never been to a rodeo, what would you say, or if this is your first year, how has Cavalcade been described to you?


A: How I describe Cavalcade to friends, family, and people who are curious is, I say, “Well, it is a weeklong rodeo, [with] multiple events — starting from barrels, poles, flags, wild horse race, bulls and broncs. It is a fun week filled with rodeo, lakes and checking out the Pioneer Woman’s Buildings.